02 August 2008

Pelekas Cutie

We were driving back from the Pelekas Graffiti Festival and stopped for an ice cream at some panoramic view and there among the verdant Bougainvillea was this kitten.

kitten spotted in pelekas 

 

 

Commentaria: If you look at the comments you'll see I spoke hastily and rashly and Maria Strani-Potts has nailed me:

"I meant to comment before," she comments, "but thought I'd challenge Busker direct: My book (in Greek) is called To Poulima tis Panoreas. It is available in Zervopoulou bookstore in Corfu.

If you take the trouble to read it or the English abridgment in Island Magazine you will see that it is far from a RANT against the distruction of Corfu, but a tragic allegory.

Interested readers who care about Corfu and the environment may find it contains some food for thought.

Look at my blog"

7 comments :

Simon B said...

I like the cat's backwood look from this beautiful torrent of violet. So I know it's for me to comment and you to blog but is there anything especially new about the piece in Island to which you're linked 'The Pimping of Panorea ('all that is beautiful')?

Busker said...

The Pimping of PanoWotsit sounds like a Maria Potts title. I've not read it and no idea why I'm linked. I think Maria is ranting against the ruining of Corfu.

Simon Baddeley said...

Isn't 'the ruining of Corfu' a bit of bore? Calls to mind that remark about the first world war "Ugh. All that smoke, so much noise!" I thought we'd done 'ruination' - got the T-shirt etc. William Blake 'mind forged manacles, harlots cry..." I love the place and your ruminations made it even better. Perhaps you are Corfu's version of the Collosus of Maroussi. Sorry embarrassing you. S

Busker said...

No embarrassment. I lazily summarised maria's 'pimping' as ranting agin ruin. one of us will pay for being a bore.

Maria Strani-Potts said...

I meant to comment before but thought I'd challenge Busker direct.
My book (in Greek) is called To Poulima tis Panoreas. It is available in Zervopoulou bookstore in Corfu.
If you take the trouble to read it or the English abridgment in Island Magazine you will see that it is far from a RANT against the distruction of Corfu, but a tragic allegory.
Interested readers who care about Corfu and the environment may find it contains some food for thought.
Look at my blog, URL mariapotts.blogspot.com

Busker said...

See? I am caught bang to rights and rightfully hammered, right down to my loose use of 'rant. Serve me right. I do hope I learn from this but, on past performance, doubt it

Loipon, I'm so glad Maria wrote in and gave me this chance to include this small correction.

I must read the english abridgment (of which I was unaware) and everyone else must too so as to cleanse in some small way my faux pas.

You know what makes me sulkiest about this whole gaffe? That I can't lay it all on that baddeley cove. i was convinced it was a comment of his that accused MS-P of ranting and looked forward to him being thoroughly duffed over. But it's me.

Simon Baddeley said...

A generous apology - like yours - has led to the start of good friendships (there's a survey somewhere). Thanks for the link - food for thought indeed. Maria S-P's allegory concentrates the problems of the earth in the place she loves in the time she lives. Consolation? If Corfu could escape her pimps the wider world might learn, but "Man strides the world leaving deserts in his wake" (Herodotus). At the time I asked you about this piece I wrote:
'...these problems are inflamed - often literally - by an idea of place that feeds on and desires to consume Greece. Every commodifying exercise, internal and external, every sexy landscape image in glossy spreads, the posters and pamphlets at conference stands and, of course, on the web, enlivens the market for matches and turns the gaze of the profiteer towards the temptations of dry tinder. Yearning leads to burning leads to earning. This is a problem for me, for everyone. If Greece finds solutions, the world finds solutions. Hurling imprecations at the corrupt may be personal therapy. It's not politics.'