21 February 2007






Stihl I Spun




No, Grasshopper, I do not remember across 50 years which brand of flying blades I favoured:



I was a lonely skinny spaz imprisoned with beefy scrum-halves and sadistic head-line bowlers.


I'd go into "The "Woods" and just throw and throw.

Wiki: "The art of knife throwing is easy to master with practice.

Fictional depictions such as movies typically portray thrown knives as traveling in a straight line from the thrower to the target, the point of the knife always forward.

This depiction is unrealistic, for unless the knife is fired, rather than thrown, it develops a rotation as it flies, making it difficult to predict whether the point or the handle will be facing toward the target when it strikes. Figuring these variables into calculations requires a good sense of distance and the ability to change the number of spins the knife undergoes before striking. These are skills that can be developed only after much practice."


I mail-ordered from catalogues of Hibben, Blazing Arrow and Colt; maybe others.


Anyway, I have a rack of them here with nothing going on. Suddenly today I mis-wielded the chainsaw and landed up with a perfectly angled target.

Other knife skills: Then there are the politer blade skills, the culinary cutters.

2 comments :

Ashley said...

That's great and greatly coincidental. I've been shopping for some new throwing knives for awhile now. Used to do it a lot, and throwing spikes (the other shuriken), when we were kids.

Busker said...

Even as I penned that, I was thinking of you as the mostly likely to lock on.

I'm so sad that you and yours aren't nearer to occupy the guest wing and use the isle as i know y'all would do.

Maybe one day. It's always here.

Let me know of any cool paradigm-pushing blades on the market. Probably like you, I can size up most handle-hefted blades in an instinct and sort out flying distance for the business end.